Courts

by Diane Robertson “’Do you remember,’ he went on, ‘writing in your diary, “Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four”?’ ‘Yes,’ said Winston. O’Brien held up his left hand, its back towards Winston, with the thumb hidden and the four fingers extended. ‘How many fingers am...

by Diane Robertson Every now and then I think of my grandparents and great grandparents and what society must have been like for them. Things were different back then. People married younger and the divorce rate was under 15%. Babies born to unwed mothers was under...

  by Erin Weist Just like most weeks, I read a lot of news articles this past week.  And, to be blunt, many of them were frankly frightening.  Most of these articles were surrounding transgender issues.  Gender identity, while still a fledgling area with insufficient basis of...

by Christie Masters   Have you ever felt like you were still on the sea even after returning to land? My daughter and I recently arrived home from a four day cruise for her graduation trip and this is exactly what we are experiencing. Standing at the...

by Diane Robertson The day before yesterday a man changing in front of a bunch of girls was called indecent exposure and was against the law– today it’s called inclusiveness and compassion. The day before yesterday, women used women’s bathrooms and locker rooms and men used...

by Diane Robertson With all the talk of equality and who can use what bathrooms and who has to give service to certain people and who can deny service to an entire state and whose conscience matters or whether the state or the federal government determine...

By Jackie Bowles February 16, 2016 brought the unexpected death of US Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. He was a well-respected and the longest serving Supreme Court Justice, being nominated in 1986 by Ronald Reagan. Justice Scalia became known for his outspoken comments on cases dealing...

by Christie Masters I had thirty seconds to tell a room full of delegates at our recent County convention why they should vote for me to be a delegate to the State Convention. Standing in line, nervously awaiting my turn, I had listened to those who...

by Mekelle Tenney On July 30th, 1956 President Eisenhower signed a law declaring “In God We Trust” as our national motto. In regards to that act he made the following statement, “In this way we are reaffirming the transcendence of religious faith in America’s heritage and future;...