“An Orderly Way of Life”

“An Orderly Way of Life”

Mother and Father with ChildMaddie Gillel

 “Teach your child an orderly way of life; it will be to his great advantage.  It’s not too early to start when your baby is born”, counseled a wise, experienced registered nurse as she spoke to a group of women, including me, attending a prenatal class.  “To do so,” she encouraged, “establish a set time for your baby’s bath each day.  It doesn’t matter what time, just so you’re consistent in bathing him at the same time each day. A baby’s bath is the most dramatic event of his day and therefore the baby will tend to regulate his young life, which consists mainly of eating and sleeping, around the bath experience.’

Feed the baby every 3-5 hours during the day (don’t wake the baby to feed him).  The baby will soon settle in to a routine that will benefit both of you – happy baby, happy mom.  He is already benefiting from an orderly way of life and so are you.”     (D. Hoole “Now is the Time to Teach Your Child an Orderly Way of Life”)

Ms. Hoole goes on to list more suggestions in raising children in an orderly environment:

1-    Establish routines – as the child matures, it’s important to establish a routine, or structure, through consistent eating, napping, and sleeping times.  Just as with the baby, a reasonable schedule makes a cooperative, obedient child.  It’s certainly unfair and terribly unkind to scold or punish a child for misbehaving when actually he’s just hungry or tired.  There is motivation in routines because the plan carries you.

2-     Be consistent – there is power and strength in consistency.  If, on occasion, you fail to be consistent, it is important to admit it and apologize to your children, promising to try harder in the future.  It’s better to acknowledge a failure than to pretend nothing went wrong.

3-   Set your child up for success – After establishing routines, the next step is to set your child up for success.  If it’s easy and convenient, they’re more likely to keep order. Toddlers and pre-schoolers thrive on ‘helping’ you by fetching items and returning them, and they can perform these little tasks well if things are in their place.  In fact, they are glad to know that everything has a ‘home’ and they’re quick to put items back in their places.  It’s when things are misplaced that children become frustrated and lose interest in helping.

4-   Instill good habits – No eating except in designated places – A place for everything and everything in its place – Pick up is part of play  – De-junk – Work smart, not just hard; preventing messes, accidents, and planning ahead can make for more order – Put the house to bed before you go to bed; an ounce of evening can be worth a pound of morning.

5-   Help your child see the rewards, both short and long term. An orderly way of life frees your child from hassle and frustration so he can make the most of his skills and talents. The habits of order and organization are transferable to any walk of life and can bring about opportunities for success. Mostly, however, the benefits and blessings of an orderly life are intrinsic such as feelings of satisfaction, fulfillment and even joy.

Mothers, don’t give up.  Plant the seed, develop the root, and someday you’ll see “fruit.”

Prayer for a Tired, Irritable Parent
(From Dear Abby)

Healthy children make lots of noise.  They sing, they shout, they belly laugh, they fight, they bang things together, they bounce things, they cry, they scream, they make lots of noise.

They play loud.  God, bless my healthy children.

Give me new ears, ears that hear the music of their noise.Give me new understanding – understanding that doesn’t crush their spirits with my intolerance and oversensitivity.

Give me a new Peace, a Peace that is grateful for the sounds created by healthy children.

”Cleanliness, neatness, and order do not guarantee happiness, but happiness is almost impossible amidst dirt,  disorder, and confusion.”   – H. B. Lee

When You Thought I Wasn’t Looking

When you thought I wasn’t looking, I saw you hang my first painting on the refrigerator, and I immediately wanted to paint another one.

When you thought I wasn’t looking, I saw you feed a stray cat, and I learned that it was good to be kind to animals.

When you thought I wasn’t looking, I saw you make my favorite cake for me, and I learned that the little things can be the special things in life.

When you thought I wasn’t looking, I heard you say a prayer, and I knew that there is a God I could always talk to, and I learned to trust in him.

When you thought I wasn’t looking, I saw you make a meal and take it to a friend who was sick, and I learned that we all have to help take care of each other.

When you thought I wasn’t looking, I saw you take care of our house and everyone in it, and I learned we have to take care of what we are given.

When you thought I wasn’t looking, I saw how you handled your responsibilities, even when you didn’t feel good, and I learned that I would have to be responsible when I grew up.

When you thought I wasn’t looking, I saw tears come from your eyes, and I learned that sometimes things hurt, but it’s all right to cry.

When you thought I wasn’t looking, I saw that you cared, and I wanted to be everything that I could be.

When you thought I wasn’t looking, I learned most of life’s lessons that I need to know to be a good and productive person when I grow up.

When you though I wasn’t looking, I looked at you and wanted to say, “Thanks for all the things I saw when you thought I wasn’t looking.         -Anonymous

 

2 Comments
  • Gillian OConnor
    Posted at 02:52h, 17 May Reply

     Lovely poem at the end Love (M)

    ________________________________

  • Diane Kunkel
    Posted at 18:50h, 17 May Reply

    Wow, great thoughts! Wish I had thought more about teaching children order when my kids were young.

Post A Comment

one + fourteen =