Pornography Addiction: The New Drug

Pornography Addiction: The New Drug

As media has become more accessible to us, the $57 billion world wide pornography industry has crept into our homes through TV, magazines and especially the Internet.

Pornography addiction has become an ever increasing problem throughout the world. Over 40 million adults in the US regularly visit pornography sites.

However the largest consumers of Internet pornography are the 12-17 age groups, mostly while doing homework. 90% of teens have viewed pornography online, which illustrates the importance of education for parents and teens on how to tread cautiously online.

Launched this month, the PornHarms website is dedicated to “providing the most accurate peer-reviewed research on the harm from pornography, along with relevant news and opinion.” The idea for the site was created when unable to find accurate research about the troubles of pornography.

“Since the advent of the internet, pornography has flooded homes, businesses, public libraries and even schools. The results have been devastating to the social and family fabric of America,” site creator Patrick Trueman stated.

PornHarms is not the only website fighting against pornography. A non-profit group based in Utah Fight the New Drug has recently launched an international campaign for pornography addiction awareness. They compare pornography addiction to the use of hard drugs such as heroine and crystal meth.

Pornography addiction is an ever growing problem that we all need to be educated about.

9 Comments
  • Patrick A. Trueman
    Posted at 10:11h, 21 February Reply

    Thank you for covering the launch of PornHarms.com. The site is dedicated to providing the most accurate peer-reviewed research on the harm from pornography, along with relevant news and opinion.

    Men, women, and children have become addicted to pornography. Visit the site and learn why.

  • Wendy Meyer
    Posted at 10:37h, 01 March Reply

    Since there is a .gov for government websites and .edu for educational websites and .org for organizational websites, why can’t there be .xxx (or something like it) for pornographic websites?

    If there were mandated extensions on sites that sell, buy, show, etc. pornography then there could also be software that would block .xxx sites from being downloaded or opened on my personal computer…by accident or on purpose.

    There are specific phone numbers used for pornographic sales or chats…phone numbers that can be blocked on my phone. Stores that sell pornography are easily identified for those who want to go there and those that want to avoid going there.

    Why can’t we have the same clear identification on the internet. It’s the place we shop, play, study, chat, research, etc. nowadays. It’s the place my children go to do their school work assignments, more now than ever before.

    There are lots of smart tech people out there and making a software that specifically blocks a certain website extension seems like an easy fix. Websites that are pornographic could be mandated to add a specific extension to their web address to make them easily identifiable.

    How can this be put into motion?? Who do I tell? Who do I contact?

    Wendy Meyer

  • Christine Robinson
    Posted at 12:40h, 03 March Reply

    Pornography is evil for many reasons, but the most important is that it spoils our ability to appreciate reality.

  • Sarah Dahl
    Posted at 17:58h, 14 April Reply

    I agree with Wendy, there should be a way to regulate the filth so that those who do not want any part of it don’t have to be. What would happen if people started slipping cocaine in people’s food at restaurants and at the grocery store? Porn is as addictive as drugs, but is worse because the effects aren’t as obvious and people don’t usually die from it. Instead they objectify women. Some become molesters, rapists, etc. Our society is so desensitized and wicked because of this evil that enters our lives through EVERY media source.

    I have seen the effects that this evil has on soldiers who are at war, away from family. The military environment is a disgusting, sleazy, free-for-all, do-what-you-want environment where men often choose to have the same self-control as the gorilla that I watched eat its own poop at the zoo the other day. I would caution those who are deploying to stay away from the filth as much as possible. I have written a pamphlet for military families: http://deploymentsexualintimacy.blogspot.com/.

  • Stop Pornography
    Posted at 23:19h, 21 June Reply

    I am so glad to see more, and more people speaking out about this problem. I still think that this is not going to be enough and we have a major epidemic of sex and pornography addicts growing up as we speak. Sometimes future looks pretty dim to me.

    Nevertheless, we must continue to spread the word, and raise the awareness. May be we cannot completely stop pornography, but perhaps we can educated the parents, that they should not let their kids watch it. (Many still do, and/or not talk about it at all).

  • Alex Wolf
    Posted at 10:00h, 08 August Reply

    “However the largest consumers of Internet pornography are the 12-17 age groups, mostly while doing homework. 90% of teens have viewed pornography online, which illustrates the importance of education for parents and teens on how to tread cautiously online.”

    This is so sad. I got really addicted to pornography when I was a teen, and my parents let me do whatever I wanted. Not because they didn’t care, but simply because they weren’t aware of the dangers involved.

  • Mary Lamphere
    Posted at 08:02h, 28 October Reply

    It’s sad to hear that so many individuals are caught in the “internet” crossfire. Parents must pay close attention to what their children are doing online and it’s vital that parents place barriers to the sites that their children can access.

    Additionally, parents must inform their children about the dangers and implications involved with regularly viewing pornography, becoming over indulged and most importantly, the dangers of repeating the actions that are viewed online.

    In a time when sexually transmitted diseases kill thousands of people each year, maybe the best fight against pornography addiction is awareness!

  • Man Quest – Part 1 | Daniel Foutz
    Posted at 01:12h, 28 March Reply

    […] porn addiction than crystal meth. That is not a statistic I pull out to scare you, it is a fact (http://unitedfamiliesinternational.wordpress.com/2010/02/19/pornography-addiction-the-new-drug/). So how can you and I beat this? We’ve fallen so far, we’re at rock bottom how can we […]

  • Man Quest – Part 1 | Man Quest
    Posted at 04:16h, 08 May Reply

    […] porn addiction than crystal meth. That is not a statistic I pull out to scare you, it is a fact (http://unitedfamiliesinternational.wordpress.com/2010/02/19/pornography-addiction-the-new-drug/). So how can you and I beat this? We’ve fallen so far, we’re at rock bottom how can we […]

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