Schools: Parents Can Make A Difference

Schools: Parents Can Make A Difference

By Grace Sailor

It is that time again – the start of another school year.  It seems like only yesterday when I was dropping my oldest son off at kindergarten, and now fifteen years later I find myself dropping my youngest off at junior high and my oldest is a junior in college. Thankfully, the dark sunglasses help to hide the tears in my eyes as I wave goodbye to my kids as they walk up the path to school that first day.

The emotions are more than just about the kids going off to school – it is the reality of how fast the time goes by and my concerns of sending them off into the world. Children grow up in a blink of an eye, as the poem, First Day of School, beautifully describes.

Being a mother is a tremendous blessing, and I believe a sacred role that should be closely guarded. As a mother, I need to protect my children, which includes being aware of the environment and curriculum that are introduced at school.  If we do not safeguard our children, who will?

I would encourage all parents to be an active participant in their child’s school and be proactive in looking through the school curriculum to screen material that may be inappropriate or contrary to pro-family values.  It is critical that parents are familiar with the guiding principles of the school district, keep up-to-date on new curriculum being introduced to students, and most importantly to not leave it to the schools to make the best decisions for your child – the most important education comes from your example and teachings.

Parents can make a difference in the school system – we need to be our children’s advocate!  Best wishes this school year to you and your family!

First Day Of School

~Author Unknown~

She started school this morning,
And she seemed so very small.
As I walked there beside her
In the Kindergarten hall.

And as she took her place beside
the others in the class,
I realized how all too soon
Those first few years can pass.

Remembering, I saw her as
She first learned how to walk.
The words that we alone made out
When she began to talk.

This little girl so much absorbed
In learning how to write.
It seems as though she must have grown
To girlhood overnight.

My eyes were blurred by hastily
I brushed the tears away
Lest by some word or sign of mine
I mar her first big day.

Oh how I longed to stay with her
And keep her by the hand
To lead her through the places
That she couldn’t understand.

And something closely kin to fear
Was mingled with my pride.
I knew she would no longer be
A baby by my side.

But she must have her chance to live,
To work her problems out,
The privilege to grow and learn
What life is all about.

And I must share my little girl
With friends and work and play;
She’s not a baby anymore —
She’s in Kindergarten today.

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