FREEDOM THROUGHOUT HISTORY -WHAT DOES IT TAKE

FREEDOM THROUGHOUT HISTORY -WHAT DOES IT TAKE

traitorMaddi Gillel

There is consistency and warning of great men throughout history – from Cicero to leaders in the 20th century – of what it takes to preserve freedom and what it takes to destroy it..  I believe we must head their warning for I cannot imagine my children and grandchildren growing up in an atmosphere of slavery

Lenin said, “The soundest strategy in war is to postpone operations until the moral disintegration of the enemy renders the mortal blow possible and easy.”

Great civilizations have died by suicide.  The first free people, the Greeks, died thus.  And why did Greece fall: A slackness and softness finally came over them to their ruin.  In the end more than they wanted freedom they wanted security, a comfortable life, and they lost all – security, comfort and freedom.

Indolence rolls out the carpet for the straight-jacket of the character-destroying  welfare state..  Others have called welfare ‘soul destroying.’  It can’t help but weaken, if not downright destroy, our greatness and strength as a nation.

Cicero said “All those who have preserved, aided, or enlarged their fatherland have a special place prepared for them in the heavens, where they may enjoy an eternal life of happiness.   The best tasks are those undertaken in defense of your native land.”

There are some people who hesitate to get into this fight for freedom because it is controversial, or they’re not sure if we’re going to win.

There are people today all over the word who in their own courageous and sometimes quiet way are working for freedom.  In many cases we will never know until the next life all they sacrificed for liberty.  These patriots are receiving heaven’s applause for the role they are playing, and in the long run that applause will be louder and longer than any they could receive in this world.

We must be able to drop off to sleep at night without having to first sing lullabies to our conscience.

“A nation can survive its fools and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within.  An enemy at the gate is less formidable, for he is known and he carries his banners openly against the city.  But the traitor moves among them within the gates freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself.  For the traitor appears no traitor; he speaks in the accents familiar to his victims. and he wears their face  and their garments, and he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men.  He rots the soul of a nation; he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of a city; he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist.  A murderer is less to be feared.  The traitor is the carrier of the plague.”  (Cicero)

This is a time when unpleasant truths must be told, “even though the telling may disturb the ease and quiet of luxurious error ..On such occasions, the criticism, slander and misrepresentation that one gets are of no consequence.” J.R. Clark

Ours is an era when socialism and social justice are confused; liberty is confused with license; morality is confused with pleasure; and constitutionality is confused with practicality.  (E.T. Benson)

The tyrant overthrows the whole . . . constitution, not by seizing any new powers, but by his misuse of the powers he already possesses.” (Cicero)

(E.T. Benson “An Enemy Hath Done This”)

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