Rejecting God and Nature

Rejecting God and Nature

Bruce JennerBy Diane Robertson

In the last ten years or so, society has seen the progression and acceptance of homosexuality and as companion to that a decline in traditional religious beliefs of marriage and family. Now that much of the western world has embraced a new-age view of marriage and sexuality, another revolution of types is occurring. Society is now seeing the progression and acceptance of gender fluidity. Not only has the world forgotten God, but nature itself.

This week Bruce Jenner appears on the cover of Vanity Fair as Caitlin, a woman. He was an incredible Olympic athlete winning a gold medal in 1976 and holding a four-year world record. He had the most superior athletic ability nature offers to man alone. As a father, he proved his maleness through reproduction, yet none of that matters now to the world. Bruce said, he was Caitlin, took female hormones, removed his male anatomy, had what was left of his parts reconstructed to look like a woman’s and now the world is calling him/her beautiful?

I am not sure if his children are calling him mom or dad or just Caitlin. But his children, like the rest of society are expected to join the bandwagon, not just against God, but against all that is before our eyes in the natural world and talk about the bravery of this “woman” and embrace “her” as heroic. Or not, and be called a hater and a bigot and narrow minded and old fashioned and judgmental, as well as plenty of obscene and irrational insults. So it’s a choice we all must make—reject, God, nature, science, and all that is real and tangible and face the wrath of more than half the western world – or join the club and start celebrating.

I’m already the person that chose to trust God in these matters and I’ll continue to believe in reality, science and the natural world. I have endured the name calling in the past and can continue to do so in the future. Still I wonder what those born male who believe they have a female brain or soul think that means?

I am a woman; I have six daughters, four sisters, a mother, a mother in law, and nine sisters -in-law, countless numbers of nieces. And even in the same family we are very different. Some of us are clean and neat and organized, others of us prefer a bit of a mess and some chaos. Some of us like all that is pink and frilly and others wouldn’t wear pink and frills if it was the last set of clothing on the planet. Some like their hair short, others long, some curled others straight. Some of us hang out in yoga pants all day and others would not go anywhere without dressing up. Some of us won’t leave the house without make up and others wouldn’t ever put on make-up. Some of us are out-spoken and gossipy, and others are shy and quiet and keep to themselves. Some like to cook or sew and others of us hate it. Some like to clean and others don’t. Some like art and music and literature and others prefer math and science and logic. Some of us are emotional and others are stoic and logical.

In fact, there are only three things we all seem to have in common and that is mothering and nurturing -with a little cattiness thrown in. Although not all of us are mothers, it is the girls that flock around to hold a new baby. Even the girls as young as one, seem to be endowed with a desire to mother. It is the girls who first respond when a child comes in crying. It is the girls who jump up first to help a child in the bathroom or to stop a disagreement between cousins. When someone is sick or has had a medical procedure or just had a baby, it is the girls that get together to make sure those family members are cared for. At family gatherings it is always the girls who plan and prepare the meals, and makes sure there is enough to go around. It is always the girls that try and temper the conversations and disagreements, though probably the first to withdraw and give the silent treatment. And when things are said and done it is always the girls that make sure the place of gathering is left in some order so that the host is not stuck with a big mess. Nurturing and mothering are all we have in common. As far as I can tell, a woman’s brain urges her to nurture, mother, and care for the physical and emotional needs of those we love.

I don’t know what a boys brain urges boys to do. Even as a wife, mother, sister, daughter, sister in law, daughter in law, niece, aunt, cousin to boys, I still find them to be a complete mystery. But I thought that was just another part of nature too.

1 Comment
  • Tawnya Mayo
    Posted at 15:00h, 03 June

    But I would add, some men are more nurturing than some women. I am one of those women who is not nurturing. Motherhood did not come naturally to me, even though I have 7 younger siblings and had plenty of chances to be mother’s helper while growing up. My husband, on the other hand, is a nurturer. He always know what one of our children needs. He is loving, patient, and understanding. I struggle with showing my kids I care about them. Even “nurturing” is a fluid concept and applies to men and women. As I like to think of it, any quality that makes us more like our Savior is desirable, whether “masculine” or “feminine.”

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