Simple Steps

Simple Steps

simple_steps_icecream

by Joseph Moore

One night after arriving home from a school dance, I found my parents watching old movies together on the couch. As soon as they heard me come through the door, they moved to the kitchen to listen to my stories and adventures of the night. They listened intently, laughing at my jokes, asking questions, and even sharing advice. They were genuinely interested in my life. They smiled warmly at me. I felt their sincerity and deep care. After talking for almost an hour, I said goodnight, gave them a hug and kiss, and moved on to my room to change clothes.

As I came back upstairs to the kitchen for some late night ice cream, I looked over at the other set of stairs to see my sweet parents. My mother had undergone thyroid surgery a few weeks earlier, and my father had recently been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. Needless to say, they were both in quite a bit of pain as they quietly limped over to the stairs to go up to bed. My parents, who had just spent almost an hour listening to their teenage son’s weekend account, began the slow uphill climb to take care of their own need for a good night’s sleep. Linked arm in arm, they made their way slowly, step by step, occasionally giggling at their situation, giving each other a loving smile. Patiently they continued on. They lifted one another up every step, one foot in front of the other. Even in their pain and weakness, they found strength in each other’s arms, eventually meeting their destination at the top of the stairs.

What an impression that scene left upon my young heart and mind. This daily example of unselfishness conveyed to me a greater understanding of how simple acts and loving words between fathers and mothers can shape the emotional health and development of their children. I love my parents for what they have taught me and even more for what they have shown me through simple daily acts.

 

Today’s post and image are contributed by Seeing the Everyday magazine. Joseph Moore’s story was first published in Seeing the Everyday no. 24. For more information, go to seeingtheeveryday.com.

 

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