Supreme Court to Hear Transgender Bathroom Case

Supreme Court to Hear Transgender Bathroom Case

by Diane Robertson

The Supreme Court of the United States has agreed to hear the transgender school bathroom case coming from the 4th Circuit Court– G.G. v. Gloucester County School Board. The ACLU sued the Gloucester County School board in behalf of a student for protecting the privacy and safety of everyone by reserving restrooms and locker rooms for members of the same biological sex, while providing an alternative private facility for students uncomfortable using the common facilities for their gender.

The ACLU cites the Obama Administration’s changes in Title IX and the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause as reasons why boys should be allowed to use girls’ facilities and girls should be allowed to use boys’ facilities at school.

The case will be heard sometime next spring with a decision before the Supreme Court recesses at the end of June. Once again 8 or 9 unelected justices will decide what they think is best for the other 300 million people in the nation.

What they decide will become standing law for all.

Given the current leanings of the court, it is not unreasonable to conclude that the sons and daughters of this nation will be told that they have no legal right to privacy while using the restrooms and locker rooms in their schools. They will be told that their desire for privacy is unnatural and discriminatory.

Another case in Minnesota illustrates the problems these changes have already caused the youth of this nation.

It is an ominous thing to allow such a small number of unelected officials so much power over the everyday lives of the people. Where one can and cannot go to the bathroom is a very personal issue. Whom our children must change their clothes in front of is an even more personal matter. These issues were best fought ought in local legislatures where the people have a significant say in the matter.

When the Obama administration made the change to Title IX, they removed the matter from local governments, thereby taking it away from the people it affects the most. The only recourse left to anyone was to petition the Supreme Court. Now we all must wait while 9 judges decide what is best for our children.

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