Reader Poll: “Is the societal shift toward women as the primary wage earner and men as “house husbands” a good thing or a bad thing?”

Reader Poll: “Is the societal shift toward women as the primary wage earner and men as “house husbands” a good thing or a bad thing?”

We asked UFI readers the following question:

“Is the societal shift toward women as the primary wage earner and men as “house husbands” a good thing or a bad thing?”

Here is their response:

3 Percent                     “Good Thing”

89 Percent                   “Bad Thing”

8 Percent                     “Doesn’t Matter”

The societal shift towards men and fathers being more engaged in the day-to-day living and care of children is a good thing and there is no reason that men can’t be more involved in the work of a household.

But the dramatic changes that have brought us to a place where more women than men in the work place (note the most recent recession) and more women than men receiving higher education – to note just a few changes – has not brought more happiness to either sex.  Our reader’s opinions seem to line up with that way of thinking and, by the way, so does the research.

You can go here to see a short list of just some of the research on the impact of working women upon marriage.

 

3 Comments
  • Paidion
    Posted at 14:25h, 31 December Reply

    If each of the parents worked half-time outside the home, and the other half within the home, this might be the best arrangement as far as the children are concerned. Not only would the parents have a greater variety in their work, but the children would have the benefit of a more equal contact with both parents.

  • Meagan
    Posted at 11:56h, 06 January Reply

    If you look at the research mothers have a better ability to help children develop their speech and social skills. The time spent in the womb also helps them be more influential, and breastfeeding secures the bond, and provides superior brain power and development. The more time spent, the better the child’s development, it doesn’t even have to be high quality time filled with lots of well-planned activities, quantity time is good enough in many instances. Fathers help children in other ways such as keeping them away from crime and moral decline–and they do this without needing to be there as much. The point I’m trying to make is that everyone needs to contribute at least enough to expand their influence so that it’s felt, and perfect half and half sounds nice in theory, but may not be the best arrangement for most families. Also, the American Heart Association found that men who are stay-at-home dads have an 82% higher risk of death from heart disease. You can read about the study here: http://articles.cnn.com/2002-04-24/health/heart.role.reversal_1_stay-at-home-dads-researchers-elaine-eaker?_s=PM:HEALTH

  • United Families International
    Posted at 21:21h, 06 January Reply

    Thanks for the link to the study on stay-at-home dads from the American Heart Association. Haven’t seen that before. As for your comments, Meagan, on the positive impact of a mother in a child’s life (breastfeeding, etc.), the benefits are well documented. Thanks for reminding us all!
    Oh yes…here’s a list of some studies on the “Benefits of Breastfeeding” http://www.unitedfamilies.dreamhosters.com/default.asp?contentID=446 And studies on “Children and their Mother’s Employment” http://www.unitedfamilies.dreamhosters.com/default.asp?contentID=446

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